Former Sen. Fritz Hollings’ casket lays in state at SC statehouse

Former Sen. Fritz Hollings’ casket lays in state at SC statehouse
People pay their respects in Columbia at Fritz Hollings' casket (Source: Live 5)

CHARLESTON, SC (WCSC) - On Monday, former U.S. Senator ‘Fritz’ Hollings joined a select few to lie in state at the South Carolina statehouse Tuesday.

Hollings’ casket will be on display from 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. when the line will be cut off, but those in line by 5 p.m. will be able to pay their respects.

His body left the James A. McCalister funeral home in West Ashley around 7:30 a.m. on Monday morning with a law enforcement escort that included police motorcycles as well as the South Carolina Highway Patrol which blocked entrance ramps on I-26 so Hollings’ casket could move to Columbia quicker.

Hollings’ casket was placed on the second floor of the statehouse around 10 a.m. when a steady stream of visitors began to pass by including Gov. Henry McMaster. The American flag and the state flag were placed next to the casket along with a portrait of Hollings.

HAPPENING NOW: The casket of former U.S. Senator and South Carolina Gov. Fritz Hollings is scheduled to leave a West Ashley funeral home for Columbia where he will lie in state >>> https://bit.ly/2v76JhH

Posted by Live 5 News on Monday, April 15, 2019

Among the others who have had the honor of having their caskets in the statehouse include U.S. Sen Strom Thurmond and former Gov. Carroll Campbell.

On Tuesday, a funeral service will take place in the Summerall Chapel at The Citadel from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. The burial will be private.

Former Vice President Joe Biden and SC Governor Henry McMaster are among the planned speakers for the funeral.

Hollings served in Congress from 1966 to 2005 and prior to serving as a U.S. senator, Hollings also served as South Carolina’s lieutenant governor from 1955 to 1959, and as governor from 1959 to 1963.

Among Hollings’ noteworthy accomplishments included integrating South Carolina schools, when other states were fighting against it. He also established the state’s technical college system and educational television.

Hollings served in the U.S. Army from 1942 to 1945.

His political career began in 1948 when he was elected to the South Carolina General Assembly at age 26.

He ran unsuccessfully for the Democratic nomination for president in 1984.

He retired from Congress on Jan. 3, 2005, at age 83. After 38 years, he told Mike Wallace of CBS’s “60 Minutes” that he was “sick or raising money to get re-elected,” so he was going home to Charleston.

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