Survey: South Carolina first in nation for speed traps - WTOC-TV: Savannah, Beaufort, SC, News, Weather & Sports

Survey: South Carolina first in nation for speed traps

MYRTLE BEACH, SC (WMBF) - Survey says, the chance of you getting pulled over in South Carolina is greater than in other states.

The National Motorists Association conducted the recent survey, and found that South Carolina is the number one state in the nation for speed traps, and one of the top places where you can find officers and troopers waiting is in the Myrtle Beach area.

Motorists in the Grand Strand say that fact is not surprising.

"Everybody knows when you're coming down the beach from North Carolina that you better be slow and watch the speed limit or you can get caught," said driver Beth Pernell.

The survey that ranks South Carolina as number one, used information from the website Speedtrap.org, and it's based on five years worth of driver's reports on speed traps.

"I don't know if they're working or not but I think it's a good idea," said driver Margaret Nemeth. "Because you shouldn't go over the speed limit. Not more than five any way."

WMBF News talked with local law enforcement and the South Carolina State Highway Patrol, and troopers say they don't do speed traps, they're simply enforcing the law.

Sonny Collins with the State Highway Patrol says it can't be a trap because all their cars are visibly marked and all the speed limits are too. So if drivers are obeying the law and watching, there's no reason why someone should get caught.

Collins also said in Horry County troopers don't sit and wait to catch you, because they're so busy handling the high number of calls.

One trooper told WMBF News that there are some of the places where you are more likely to find them, on highways and roads that have a lot of traffic, and a lot of accidents.

Myrtle Beach Police say so far this year from patrols they have given out more then 2,000 speeding tickets. Last year's total came out to more than 4,000.

Drivers say it's a pricey lesson.

"I think a lot of people can adhere to the speed limit trying to be safe," said Pernell. "Nobody can afford a ticket."

Copyright 2012 WMBF News. All rights reserved.

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