Local pilot has many questions in San Francisco plane crash inve - WTOC-TV: Savannah, Beaufort, SC, News, Weather & Sports

Local pilot has many questions in San Francisco plane crash investigation

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The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating a deadly crash landing at San Francisco International Airport on Saturday. (Source: NTSB/CNN) The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating a deadly crash landing at San Francisco International Airport on Saturday. (Source: NTSB/CNN)
COLUMBIA, SC (WIS) -

Investigators are interviewing the pilots of the Asiana flight that crashed at San Francisco's International Airport, hoping to get some answers on how it happened.

FAA officials are trying to determine if the pilot's experience played a role. One pilot was in training and had less than 50 hours experience on the Boeing 777. The other had recently become a flight trainer.

Former Delta Airlines pilot John Busch said their doesn't appear to have been anything out of the ordinary with the pilots onboard Asiana Flight 214.

Four crew members were in the cockpit. That's four sets of eyes who should've been making sure the plane was on course for landing.

"With aviation, there are not just one system in place to do a job, there are multiple systems in place to make sure you can do the job," said Busch.

Busch wants to know why the pilot waited so long to abort the landing. Investigators say the call went out less than two seconds before impact.

He says typically an abort would've been called at least a mile away from landing.

"The crew would fly the airplane first, make sure the plane is climbing away from the ground, figure out where they're going, then their last priority would be to tell the tower," said Busch "Not only that, the tower can see they're going around so they'll know something's not right."

Many, including investigators, are questioning the pilot's experience. He had limited time in the 777 and had never landed one at San Francisco International.

Busch isn't concerned with those two facts. In fact, he says with training simulators, co-pilots, and computers as good as they are, a commercial pilot will land a jet for the first time with a few hundred passengers riding along.

"Many years ago, airlines would send up an airplane empty in the back with just a pilot and an instructor pilot to get those practice landings, but that was before simulators were as good as they are today," said Busch.

But with no evidence of mechanical failure, investigators are focusing on the four people in the cockpit.

"Whether or not there was a miscommunication with the captain and the co-pilot, or whether or not the captain thought the auto throttles were set and that the plane was taking care of the speed, maybe their was a miscommunication, maybe something happened with the equipment," said Busch. "We don't know yet."

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