Meth Aftermath: The affects on children - WTOC-TV: Savannah, Beaufort, SC, News, Weather & Sports

Meth Aftermath: The affects on children

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EFFINGHAM CO., GA (WTOC) -

Jittery babies, neglected and abused toddlers, children used and sold for drugs. These are just some of the nightmares children live through when their parents use and sell meth. The children have deep wounds, not just physically, but emotionally.

Many meth labs that authorities have dismantled were "mom and pop" labs in homes where children live. The children are not only exposed to the drug but the toxins contaminate the furniture, walls, carpet and even their toys.

Then you have the long-term neglect from parents obsessed with their drug habits.

Thousands of children across the country have been taken away from meth abusing parents and placed into already overloaded foster care systems. Scores have been injured, a dozen or more killed, thousands have been born with traces of meth in their bodies.

"The main concern is the damage it is doing to the children, not just the adults, but to the children themselves," said a foster parent.

To protect the children, WTOC has hidden the identity of this foster parent, who says these children are often removed from homes that are filthy with drug paraphernalia and pornography all over the place.

Meth making chemicals have even been found in diaper bags, book bags and even toy chests. Some children are injured from explosions, or exposed to toxic chemicals.

"Children that come out of situations like that have a lot of health problems. It can develop into serious health problems. Some children that I am quite sure have taken drugs to school as they get older, if they're not taken out of it."

Many children rescued from meth homes turn out just fine, but some suffer serious brain damage, and others experience long lasting developmental problems.

"There will be some children that will just not learn very well. They'll just be constantly in another world thinking about other things."

Then there are the scars that are harder to see. Many are neglected, deprived of basic food and medical care, and many times they experience physical, emotional, and sexual abuse.

"It affects them their whole life and it's really sad. It really is sad."

So what can you do help a child that may be in a meth-using home?

Encourage the child to not stay quiet. If they know something is not right, tell somebody so it can be reported. Adults can contact local law enforcement agencies to report what is going anonymously.

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