Ogeechee Circuit District Attorney weighs in on HIV threat - WTOC-TV: Savannah, Beaufort, SC, News, Weather & Sports

District attorney weighs in on HIV threat

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Ogeechee Circuit District Attorney Richard Mallard said knowingly spreading HIV considered a serious crime and a suspect could face up to 10 years in jail for each victim. Ogeechee Circuit District Attorney Richard Mallard said knowingly spreading HIV considered a serious crime and a suspect could face up to 10 years in jail for each victim.
STATESBORO, GA (WTOC) -

The Ogeechee Circuit District Attorney warns that spreading HIV to others is a serious crime and a person could face a minimum of 10 years in jail. this comes after Georgia Southern University announced a person is spreading the disease without warning his partners. 

Georgia Southern Public Safety officials are looking for a man they believe is intentionally or knowingly spreading HIV to his partners. It is a crime that faces serious repercussions to the victim and the suspect. 

A person could face felony charges of reckless conduct by an infected person, if they are found to have participated in a sex act, biting or an oral exchange without disclosing their condition. District Attorney Richard Mallard said the school is going on reports given to a school counselor. Mallard said this is considered a serious crime and a suspect could face up to 10 years in jail for each victim. 

"It is obviously a health concern to the community," said Ogeechee Circuit District Attorney Richard Mallard. "It has far reaching consequences for those affected and it kind of goes to show you need to know who you are engaging in contact with." 

Mallard said cases like this are not uncommon and are a serious threat to the community. He said he's seen cases like this before in Bulloch County, many involving prostitutes. Mallard stressed the most important thing right now is protecting students and people in the community. 

Georgia Southern and the Health Department are reminding people that HIV testing is free to the public. This comes after the announcement that a man is intentionally or knowingly infecting his partners. 

The health department said the test is quick and results are available in just 20 minutes. There are two options, a blood sampling, which is a prick of the finger or an oral swab of the cheek. The test looks for HIV antibodies and both are accurate. An additional test will be done to confirm if positive. Health officials say they will then offer support and counseling. They suggest getting tested if you use needles, have had a history of STDs or have had unprotected sex with multiple partners or an HIV positive person. 

Anyone who believes they were a victim of this man should contact the University Public Safety Dept. 

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