Kids MD - Abdominal Pain (ER Story) - WTOC-TV: Savannah, Beaufort, SC, News, Weather & Sports

12/01/04

Kids MD - Abdominal Pain (ER Story)

Marc Straus | CWK Network

“The fever wasn’t due to the strep at all. It was due to probably a viral infection that was causing his abdominal pain and his chest pain.”
- Dr.
Kathleen Nelson, professor of pediatrics -

“What made you bring Trent to the emergency room today?” asks Dr. Kathleen Nelson, professor of pediatrics at the University of Alabama, Birmingham.

Trent’s mom explains that her son was ”running a fever, complaining of breathing problems, shortness of breath, stomach pain.” But even though the 7-year-old has been on amoxicillin, an antibiotic, for days, he’s not getting better. “Over the three days since he’s begun the antibiotic his fever has actually increased and his abdominal pain and lower part of his chest was also hurting, and had become worse over the last three days, so his mom brought him to the doctor, to the ER”.

He’s had pneumonia twice and strep throat several times this year. Why does he keep getting sick? The doctors ordered lots of tests to find the answer. First X-rays and then a CT scan and finally blood tests. All the tests came back normal. So why does he have the fever and the chest pain and stomach pain?

Dr. Nelson says: “Our feeling was: He probably had a virus. And the reason his temperature didn’t respond to the antibiotic that was given for the strep was the fever wasn’t due to the strep at all. It was due to probably a viral infection that was causing his abdominal pain and his chest pain.”

So an unnamed virus is the likely suspect, a virus that can’t be cured by antibiotics. The body’s immune system will get rid of the virus on its own, in time. The treatment is simple: Tylenol and fluids. Dr. Nelson noted that after that, Trent looked “wonderful,” and she sent the boy home.

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