CBP, CDC policies, procedures, protocols for ports of entry - WTOC-TV: Savannah, Beaufort, SC, News, Weather & Sports

CBP, CDC policies, procedures, protocols for ports of entry

CBP and the CDC have closely coordinated to develop policies, procedures, and protocols to identify travelers at all ports of entry who potentially infected with a communicable disease and to minimizes the risk to the traveling public. These procedures have been utilized collaboratively by both agencies on a number of occasions with positive results. CBP personnel review all travelers entering the United States for general overt signs of illnesses (visual observation, questioning, and notification of CDC as appropriate) at all U.S. ports of entry, including all federal inspection services areas at U.S. airports that service international flights, land-border crossings and seaports.

In addition to the measures already in place at all ports of entry, CBP and CDC have developed enhanced passenger screening for travelers entering the United States from or through an Ebola-affected country. These measures will be in place at the five U.S. airports where about 94 percent of travelers from Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone arrive. JFK implemented enhanced screening Saturday, Oct. 11. On Thursday, Oct. 16, enhanced screening begins at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport, Dulles International Airport in Virginia, Hartsfield Jackson International Airport in Atlanta and Newark International Airport in New Jersey. The enhanced screening includes isolating the traveler from the traveling public while the individual completes a questionnaire and contact information form and medically trained personnel take the traveler's temperature. If the traveler has a fever or other symptoms or may have been exposed to Ebola, CBP will refer the traveler to CDC for a public health assessment. CDC will then determine whether the traveler can continue to travel, is taken to a hospital for further evaluation, or referred to a local health department for further monitoring.

CBP personnel at all U.S. ports of entry, including all U.S. airports that service international flights, continue to observe all travelers entering the United States for general overt signs of illnesses (visual observation, questioning, and notification of CDC as appropriate) and continues to distribute a CDC health notice to travelers entering the U.S. that have traveled from or transited through the affected countries informing travelers to watch their health and what they need to do if they become ill in the future. When a traveler is identified with a possible communicable disease or identified from information that is received from the CDC, CBP personnel will take the appropriate safety measures by donning personal protective equipment (PPE), to include gloves and surgical masks, which are readily available for use in the course of their duties.

CBP personnel receive training in illness recognition, but if they identify an individual believed to be infected, CBP will contact CDC along with local public health authorities to help with further medical evaluation. The traveler would be isolated from the traveling public while the CDC and local public health authorities conduct an evaluation.

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