Sec. of State discusses Georgia voter motivation - WTOC-TV: Savannah, Beaufort, SC, News, Weather & Sports

Sec. of State discusses Georgia voter motivation

(Source: WTOC) (Source: WTOC)
(Source: WTOC) (Source: WTOC)
GEORGIA (WTOC) -

The Georgia Secretary of State says it's too soon to determine whether Election Day turnout will set a new record for the state as it did in early voting.

Something is certainly motivating people to get out and vote this election cycle, but we found their reasons were all over the map.

While some came out to the polls to vote for a specific candidate Tuesday, others say they only voted in hopes to oppose another candidate.

Almost everyone we spoke with said there's no excuse to not get out and exercise your right to vote.

Although it only took her an hour and a half, voters like Allison Smith said they would have waited all day if that's what it took.

Early voter turnout in Georgia and Chatham County set new records this year. It's still unclear just how many folks came out Tuesday, but long lines at almost every precinct could foreshadow a new record as well. 

But what's driving people to the polls, especially after a contentious race that's left some voters unhappy with both presidential candidates...?

"You definitely had to do the research on what you wanted and who was the best candidate for it," recalled Allison Smith, voter.

"A lot of people are out because of Hillary Clinton being the first woman president... A lot of them are with trump because he has good ideas about bringing the economy back," said Ron Bosiljevac.

Secretary of State Brian Kemp told me on the phone today -- he believes the record turnout can be contributed to a number of different factors.

"It really just depends on the individualized voter. Some people are voting because of the balance of the supreme court... Other people are voting for women issues," said Brian Kemp, Sec. of State.

"If you're offending women, you're offending me," said Linda Carter, voter.

For some, the decision was easier than others. But the one thing these voters have in common - most were willing to wait as long as it took to cast their vote.

"Just get out there and do it because then you say you did it and you can't complain that you didn't," said Smith.

The polls will be open until 7 p.m. in Georgia.

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