Food recalls: What you should know - WTOC-TV: Savannah, Beaufort, SC, News, Weather & Sports

Food recalls: What you should know

Timely reporting of problems helps the FDA to act quickly when food makes you sick. (Source: AP/Jeffery Martin/Virginia State Parks/Wikicommons) Timely reporting of problems helps the FDA to act quickly when food makes you sick. (Source: AP/Jeffery Martin/Virginia State Parks/Wikicommons)

(RNN) - You play an important role in food safety.

Timely reporting of problems helps the FDA to act quickly when food makes you sick.

When two or more people get the same illness from the same contaminated food or drink, it is considered foodborne disease outbreak.

Public health officials investigate outbreaks to control them and to learn how to prevent similar outbreaks from happening in the future.

If you think you have food poisoning or an allergic reaction to food, call your doctor. If it’s an emergency, call 911.

The FDA handles most food and pet food complaints, as well as medicines, medical devices, vaccines, veterinary drugs, animal feed and devices that emit radiation.

Contact the FDA main emergency number at 866-300-4374

There also are consumer complaint coordinators for each state.

When reporting food problems, remember the following steps:

  • Report what happened as soon as possible, with names and contact information of persons affected. Include your name, address and phone number, as well as that of the doctor or hospital if emergency treatment was provided.
  • Describe the product, including codes or identifying marks on the label or container.
  • Give the name and address of the store where the product was purchased.
  • Include the date of purchase.
  • Report the problem to the manufacturer or distributor shown on the label and to the store where you purchased the product.

Copyright 2017 Raycom News Network. All rights reserved.

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