GA Power develops new Storm Center in ATL to help customers duri - WTOC-TV: Savannah, Beaufort, SC, News, Weather & Sports

GA Power develops new Storm Center in ATL to help customers during hurricane season

(Source: WTOC) (Source: WTOC)
ATLANTA (WTOC) -

Nobody wants to think about it, but we're already into another hurricane season. 

Hurricanes and other storms can knock out power any time of year. Georgia Power has developed a new storm center in Atlanta to help customers in our area and around the state. WTOC got an extensive look at how they're prepared to keep your power on in the storm. 

Losing power during a storm can be one of the most frustrating feelings. You might feel like nobody is hurrying to help, but at the new storm center, Georgia Power is trying to get resources on the ground to help - resources from around the state and beyond. 

Hurricanes Matthew and Irma left hundreds of thousands of people without power as crews worked almost around the clock to get electricity restored. Georgia Power's new Storm Center inside their headquarters gives decision-makers the information they need to send crews to the places that need them the most. 

"It's instrumental in making sure that areas that might be overwhelmed by all the resources they might not be able to handle, that we take some of the pressure off them," said David Maske, Operations Manager. 

They not only send people, but a mobile city to keep them close to where they're needed with showers and a place to sleep for day after day until the work is done. 

"This is our 36-bed sleeper unit. It's three bunks high. Each bunk is a six-foot-six bunk. It has a privacy light, privacy drapes, and a charging station," said Greg Detwiler, Logistics Director. 

This mobile command center goes on site to help direct crews wherever they may be. Back in Atlanta, another team uses Georgia Power's social media platforms to update outage restoration and other information. 

"If they've been evacuated, if they've lost power somehow otherwise, their mobile device might be their only connection," said John Kraft, Georgia Power Spokesperson. 

It's a connection that lets customers know someone is working to get their power on after the storm. 

They've taken things they learned in Matthew and Irma and built them into this new center, but they hope they don't need them for some time. 

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