Heroes on the Homefront: Tattnall County Women's Auxiliary - WTOC-TV: Savannah, Beaufort, SC, News, Weather & Sports

Heroes on the Homefront: Tattnall County Women's Auxiliary

Geraldine Miller started the Tattnall County Women's Auxiliary letter writing campaign 20 years ago. Geraldine Miller started the Tattnall County Women's Auxiliary letter writing campaign 20 years ago.
Last year, the group was honored for the 5,000 pieces of mail it sent to U.S. Soldiers overseas in 2006, most among the nation's VFW groups. Last year, the group was honored for the 5,000 pieces of mail it sent to U.S. Soldiers overseas in 2006, most among the nation's VFW groups.

REIDSVILLE, GA (WTOC) - In an age of electronic communication, even soldiers serving overseas can be reached more often and more immediately than ever before. 

But there is just something about a hand-written letter, an intimacy or personal investment by the writer, that doesn't come through a computer screen. And nobody has been communicating that affection more lately than the Tattnall County Women's Auxiliary.  

"Well, we just thank them for serving the country and we wish them Godspeed and god bless them,'' says Geraldine Miller, who has been a member of the group for more than 20 years. "Just like you would write to your son and daughter.'' 

The daughters of Tattnall County, in conjuncture with the VFW post there, have made sure that word has gotten out to US military around the world. 

Last year, their Christmas letter-writing project at the Reidsville Library produced 2,500 personalized notes to soldiers.   

The year before, they mailed 5,000 letters overseas, ranking them first among the nation's VFW groups. 

Only miller, who has been a member of the Tattnall Women's Auxiliary since returning to the area in 1985 and started the letter-writing campaign 20 years ago, would consider it the least she could do. 

"It does us good too,'' said Miller. "It feels like we're doing something. you know, when you get older, there's not too much you can do. You feel like you can sit down and write letter just to thank someone for serving the country anyway. You feel very patriotic.'' 

That, according to someone quite familiar with the effect support from home has on our deployed military, is a valid feeling. 

Major General Rick Lynch, Commander of the Third Infantry Division, says he smiles whenever he receives a package of letters from people he's never met. 

"And I can tell when I walk around my headquarters or on the battlefield,'' Lynch said in a satellite interview with WTOC. "Those soldiers who just received something from home because they've got those same smiles. "

And they can count on those smiles to keep coming from the ladies in Tattnall County. 

 Reported by: Tim Guidera, tguidera@wtoc.com - Read more of Tim's stories here.

Powered by Frankly