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Tornadoes in the Lowcountry injured more than 60, killed 6 people on Monday

Updated: Apr. 16, 2020 at 5:13 AM EDT
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CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Officials with the National Weather Service said 67 people were injured and six were killed in the Lowcountry when tornadoes swept through the state early Monday morning.

On Wednesday, meteorologists confirmed several tornadoes which they say was part of a severe weather storm that killed at least nine people throughout South Carolina.

The tornadoes confirmed by the NWS include those in Hampton County, Moncks Corner, Colleton County and Edisto Island.

Damage in Hampton County.
Damage in Hampton County.(Live 5 News)

NWS officials said the vast majority of injuries and fatalities reported were in Hampton County where a powerful EF3 tornado with estimated 165 mph winds killed five people and injured 60 people.

The tornado also caused damage to trees and powerlines along its path, which officials reported stretched more than 24 miles from Estill to nearly the Colleton County line.

The most significant damage happened just south of Estill where five people died.

“At least six residences were destroyed in the hardest hit areas, but there were many others that sustained various levels of damage along the entire path,” NWS officials said.

Clean up efforts are underway in a Moncks Corner neighborhood after a possible tornado came...
Clean up efforts are underway in a Moncks Corner neighborhood after a possible tornado came through Monday morning. (Source: Live 5 News)(Live 5 News)

In Moncks Corner, officials confirmed an EF2 tornado with 120 mph winds which injured six people.

The tornado began in the Fairlawn Subdivision, just east of Moncks Corner.

Authorities reported several homes had significant damage along Old Fort Road and Dennis Boulevard.

“There was also extensive snapping and uprooting of trees, as well as vehicle and trailer damage in the area,” NWS officials said." The tornado moved east-southeast, generally down Dennis Blvd, then eastward across the west branch of the Cooper River, finally ending near the intersection of SC-402 and Cane Gully Road."

According to a report, this tornado was part of a family of tornadoes that began more than 100 miles to the southwest in Screven County, Georgia.

The Colleton County Sheriff's Office shared photos of storm damage from the Walterboro Airport...
The Colleton County Sheriff's Office shared photos of storm damage from the Walterboro Airport Monday morning.(Colleton County Sheriff's Office)

Officials also confirmed three tornadoes in Colleton County where one person was killed and another injured.

The tornado was reported as an EF1 with 110 mph winds which formed near Route 63. According to the NWS, this tornado grew in size as it tracked through Walterboro and then tracked northeastward through the Lowcountry Regional Airport and then further northeast with a preliminary length of about 8 miles.

“This tornado produced extensive tree damage along the path across northwestern portions of Walterboro with many hundreds of trees snapped off or uprooted,” NWS officials said."Trees falling on houses or the wind associated with the tornado produced mainly minor damage to hundreds of residences and some businesses."

In this area, a large pine tree fell through a section of a home killing a person and injuring another.

At the Lowcountry Regional Airport, winds associated with the tornado or winds flowing into the tornado damaged or destroyed most hangers and damaged or destroyed nearly two dozen aircraft, a report states.

NWS officials said a second tornado with 105 mph winds formed along Route 63 west of Interstate 95 and traveled northeast a little over 3 miles before dissipating in or near the Ashepoo River/Jones Swamp area just west of Interstate 95.

"The tornado produced extensive tree damage in the vicinity of Beach Road," NWS officials said."The tornado overturned a tractor trailer near mile marker 55 on Interstate 95. Hundreds of trees were snapped off or uprooted along the path."

A third tornado with 90 mph winds formed just west of Route 21 in southwest Colleton County and traveled about 1.5 miles northeast before dissipating.

The tornado snapped off a couple dozen pine trees and broke off some tree branches along the path.

The tornado is believed to have started as a waterspout off the coat and then moved inland...
The tornado is believed to have started as a waterspout off the coat and then moved inland across Edisto Island.(Live 5 News)

On Edisto Island, the National Weather Service said an EF2 tornado touched down with 125 mph winds.

It is believed to have started as a waterspout off the coast and then moved inland across Edisto Island. Reports say the tornado ripped portions or large sections of roofs off of six homes.

The home most affected by the storm was on the beach in the 3300 block of Palmetto Boulevard where glass doors and windows were broken in and large sections of the roof were removed.

Crews working to remove a tree from the top of a car in Georgetown County.
Crews working to remove a tree from the top of a car in Georgetown County.(Live 5 News)

In Georgetown County, NWS officials confirmed three tornadoes formed during Monday morning’s storms.

Two of them began within minutes of each other about 10 miles west of Georgetown. According to meteorologists, the tornadoes reached EF1 intensity with 90 to 100 mph winds.

“Damage was observed to trees, power lines, homes, a business, and to vehicles,” NWS officials said.

Another tornado formed on Highway 17 in North Litchfield Beach. According to officials, this tornado damaged trees and homes before moving into Huntington Beach State Park, breaking tree limbs near the beach.

“The tornado moved just off the coast becoming a strong waterspout near Murrells Inlet jetty,” NWS officials said."A remote weather station there operated by Weatherflow recorded a peak wind gust of 114 mph at 8:47 a.m. as the tornado moved very near or over the site."

No injuries or fatalities were reported from the three tornadoes.

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