Potential government shutdown will impact civilians and vets - WTOC-TV: Savannah, Beaufort, SC, News, Weather & Sports

Government shutdown could impact civilians and vets

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The potential government shutdown could affect both civilians and military vets The potential government shutdown could affect both civilians and military vets
Active duty and training will not be affected by the potential shutdown Active duty and training will not be affected by the potential shutdown
Tom Tarantino, spokesman for the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America Tom Tarantino, spokesman for the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America
Veterans could be affected by the government shutdown Veterans could be affected by the government shutdown
BEAUFORT CO., SC (WTOC) -

From Washington, DC to Beaufort, South Carolina, all eyes are on the clock as a possible government shutdown will determine who will go to work tomorrow and whether they'll get paid on time.

The Senate has adopted a bill that will clear the way to pay military employees if a government shutdown happens. However, civilian employees will most likely not get their paychecks on time.

The Marine Corps Air Station has 1200 civilian employees. Everyone is on standby for the latest on the possible government shutdown.

Fortunately, some of those fears have been eased now that both chambers of Congress passed a bill to keep paying military troops if a government shutdown happens.

At Parris Island, officials say the shutdown will not impact recruit training, but "civilian and military personnel have been notified of the potential for a government shutdown and have made preparations."

Of the 442 civilian employees at Parris Island, it's not known how many will be working Tuesday but they say some will work only four hours tomorrow and follow an "orderly shutdown."

Veterans may also feel the pinch in this crisis. Millions of veterans receive disability payments but if there's no money, payments could stop.

"It's what they need to pay rent, get food. It's not their total income, but it's a significant part of it, and taking that out of the mix, because the government can't get its act together, is really dangerous for these men and women who need it the most," Tom Tarantino, spokesman for the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America.

Officials with the Marine Corps Air Station told us they do have a plan in place if there is a government shutdown.

In a statement by 1st Lt. Jean Durham, deputy director of public affairs:

"Pending the decisions by our government's civilian leadership in Washington, DC, we are standing by for specific direction from Headquarters Marine Corps.  However, civilian and military personnel have been notified of the potential for a government shutdown and have made preparations.  If a shutdown does occur, recruit training and our mission of making Marines will continue in the interest of National Security."

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